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AP Statistics -- Platt

AP Syllabus 2014-2015

 

 

 

AP Statistics Syllabus Part I

 

Mission Bay students: 

Inquire; they develop their natural curiosity. In this statistics course, MB students will acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research, as well as demonstrate independence in learning.

Are open-minded; they understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives. In this statistics course, MB students will learn how to seek information to evaluate a range of points of view. 

Are risk-takers; they approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought. In this statistics course, MB students will learn the skills to explore the effectiveness of new ideas and strategies and to use statistics to defend their findings.

Are balanced; they understand the value of intellectual, physical and emotional balance.  In this statistics course, MB students will read medical journal synopsis of the effects of leading a life that well balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.

Description: 

Please see the 8-page Course Description, Content/Unit & Skills Acquired,

Course Outline and Pacing Schedule posted on the Internet.

 

Text:

Yates, Dan, David S. Moore, and Daren S. Starnes. The Practice of Statistics: TI-83/89 Graphing Calculator Enhanced, 3rd ed. New York: W. H. Freeman & Co., 2008.

 

Required Calculator:

A Ti-83 Graphing Calculator is MANDATORY.  Ti-84 will work as well.  Should you not choose to purchase one, MBHS will provide one to use in the class room. Technology, graphing calculators with statistical capabilities, and Internet simulators are a part of every class.

 

Objective: 

The primary objective of the course is to prepare for the AP Statistics Examination. 

 

 

To achieve these objectives, students will need to:

Be present at every class meeting, for the entire meeting,

Read and re-read the assigned material,

Amend class notes,

Participate in class to their full potential and show enthusiasm for in-class activities, and

Practice at home to reinforce the concepts and mechanics of Statistics presented. 

 

 

 

 

Credit: 

AP Statistics earns college credit to students who earn a “3” or above on the AP Statistics Exam.  This course also fulfills the “A to G” math credit for graduation and admission to University of California or California State University

 

Grading Policy:

 

90-100%=A                                           Assessments                              60%  

80-89%=B                                            Assignments                               20%

67-79%=C                                            Participation                                10%

NO D’s (Departmental Policy)                Class Work                                 10%

 

 

Assignment Policy:  Independent Study reinforces math covered in class.  Reading the material is essential.  Assignments are based on the reading as well as the class work.  Practice is necessary for students master the concepts presented in this course. 

Scoring of the assignments:                   0 pts.  = Not turned in

                                                            2 pt.    = Seriously Lacking

                                                            4 pts.  = Incomplete

                                                            7 pts.  = Majority of work complete

                                         10 pts.  = Exemplary

 

Late Assignments:  One day (24 hours) late, but complete assignments may earn up to 5 pts.

 

 

Classroom Rules:

  1.      Show respect at all times.
  2.      The Golden Rule: do unto others as you would have done to yourself. 
  3.      Follow the “no electronics or get a U” policy and use good judgment.
  4.      Follow the “no scented products or get a U” to ensure a safe environment.
  5.      Come to class prepared to learn. 
  6.      Bring your pencil, blue pen, black pen, yellow crayon, book, and 3-ring binder.
  7.      Do not talk when I am talking, or when another student is sharing out.
  8.      Whisper if you are helping your neighbor.
  9.      No Food, Gum, or Drink other than Water.  We have ants and other insects.
  10.      Smile.

 

Consequences:

Should you decide to ignore my rules, here are the consequences. 

(Please do not let all occur in one day.)

 

  1.      Verbal Warning
  2.      Separation
  3.      Written Documentation
  4.      Call to Parents – A call home will result in an automatic “U”.
  5.      Referral

 

Expectations:

  • You are expected to use a 3-ring binder (no spiral notebooks) to maintain three sections with dividers.   You may include other subjectsin your binder.  Three sections: Assignments, Class Notes, Review Journal.
  • You are expected to be neat and organized.  This includes clearly heading Assignments with the date and page numbers.  Class notes should include color, information boxes, diagrams and highlighting to demonstrate that you have reviewed your notes and amended them. 
  • You are expected to complete all Internet assignments on time.
  • You are expected to print-out and to return your signed Schoology grades.  Failure to do so will affect your citizenship grade.  
  • You are expected to initiate your own make-up work. 
  • You are expected to initiate your own retake assessments within 1 week and you may earn up to 70% credit.
  • You are expected to ask for help during the 90 minutes you are inside class, to keep-up with all assigned reading and to re-read your college text book.  Many of your questions will be answered by reading and re-reading your text.

     

     

    I expect my students to show their best effort and to follow my rules.  I expect students to improve their math, reading and writing skills and to be successful.

     

    You can expect me, your teacher, to show up every day dedicated to your success.  You can expect a safe learning environment, encouragement, fair and consistent grading policies and a thoughtful if not thought provoking lesson. 

     

    I expect you, my students, to share your Schoology account with your parents/guardians, so that they will be able to reward you for all of your effort as well as be able to monitor your progress. 

     

    I have read and understood the rules and procedures for Mrs. Platt’s class. 

    A Schoology (Internet) account will be created for this course.

     

     

     

    ___________________________   _________________________            __________

    Student Signature                          Parent Signature                                Date

     

     

     

    ___________________________ 

    Daytime Phone Number              

     

     

    Thank you,

    Mrs. Platt

    cplatt@sandi.net  or 858-273-1313 x 223

 

AP Statistics Syllabus Part II

Course Description

AP Statistics covers four main areas: exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. According to the College Board, upon entering this course students are expected to have “mathematical maturity

and quantitative reasoning ability”. Mathematical maturity may be:a complete working knowledge of the graphical and algebraic concepts through Math Analysis, including linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. This course requires extensive reading and relies on videos outside of class, the daily use of technology such as graphing calculators as well as the use of statistical software packages such as Excel and minitab.  This course

includes activity-based lessons to encourage students to construct their own understanding of the concepts and techniques of statistics.   This course requires students to arrive in class well-read and prepared to participate.

 

Course Text and Supplements

Teaching materials for this course come from textbooks, classroom lectures, newspapers, journals, medical newsletters, videos, and the Internet.  Students

also have access to a classroom set of TI-83 calculators. Textbooks include:

 

Yates, Dan, David S. Moore, and Daren S. Starnes. The Practice of Statistics: TI-83/89 Graphing Calculator Enhanced, 3rd ed. New York: W. H. Freeman & Co., 2008.

 

Allan J. RossmanBeth L. ChanceWorkshop Statistics: Discovery with Data, 4th ed. NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2012. 

 

 

Course Projects

Course projects are in the form of extended formal writing assignments. As a consequence, form and technical adequacy are enforced. The main purpose of course projects is to strengthen student understanding through personal experience.  Students will develop statistical studies and make comprehensive connections between the design of the study and the results of the experiment.

 

Example: (Final Project)

Part 1 (1/3 of project grade) You will revisit the information you collected in your experimental design project.  Analyze the data you collected in each project using an appropriate test for inference.  Were your original results valid? Were all necessary assumptions for each test met?  What can you reasonably conclude from your data?

 

Part 2 (2/3 of project grade)

The first task is to decide on an appropriate, useful and interesting question to investigate. One component of answering the question must involve an hypothesis test, a confidence interval, and/or a regression. Data may be collected via an observational study, a survey, or an experiment. If you choose a study, you must obtain your data through firsthand Course Projects sources.

 

Surveys must be representative of the population and must be preapproved.

You must use at least 37 pieces of data. 

 

Complete these steps and submit this part of the report before collecting any data:

 

• Describe the question you wish to investigate.

 

• Diagram and explain the design of your observational study, survey, or

  experiment.  Include all steps taken to reduce confounding and bias. Describe

  methodology, specifically explain how you will set up and perform all steps. 

 

• Explain the criteria you will use to draw conclusions. Include any

  assumptions you will need to make.

 

Collect your data as you described in your initial report.

Your final report should include the following:

 

• Tables and graphical presentations, as appropriate for your study.

  Clearly label what data are displayed.

 

• A description of any deviations you made from your initial description

  of the data collection process.

 

• A description of any bias present and your attempts to eliminate it.

 

• An appropriate inference procedure, used to answer the initial question  

  posed, along with an interpretation of the result.

 

• Conclusions you are able to draw from this procedure.

 

• If you worked in a pair, list all the specific duties each partner completed.

  Each partner is expected to contribute equally.

 

Format and Style

The report must have the following elements:

 

• It must be word-processed. Use an application such as Equation Editor or

  Math Type for mathematical expressions, equations, and symbols.

 

• It must have a cover page that includes all pertinent information and a

  bibliography and/or list of URLs.

 

• All symbols used must be defined in context. All formulas employed must be

  shown, explained and set up.

 

• Graphs and tables must be neat, labeled, and accurate. Graphs may be

  drawn by hand or be computer generated.

 

• Avoid “Calculator-Speak”; i.e.,  “We  used LinReg L1, L2 to get the  LSRL.”

 

 

 

SC10—The course

demonstrates the use of computers and/or computer output to enhance the development

of statistical understanding through exploring data, analyzing data, and/or assessing models.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SC6—The course draws connections between all aspects of the statistical process including design, analysis, and conclusions.

 

SC7—The course teaches students how to communicate methods, results and interpretations using the vocabulary of statistics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SC2 The course provides instruction in sampling.

 

 

 

 

 

SC6—The course draws connections between all aspects of the statistical process including design, analysis, and conclusions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SC7—The course teaches students how to communicate methods, results and interpretations using the vocabulary of statistics.

 

 

 

Content/Unit & Skills Acquired

An assessment follows every unit of study.

 

Exploration of Data

Graphing and Numerical Distributions [SC1]

The student will:

• Identify the individuals and variables in a set of data.

• Identify each variable as categorical or quantitative.

• Make and interpret bar graphs, pie charts, dot plots, stem

  plots,   and histograms of distributions of a categorical variable.

• Look for overall patterns and skewness in a distribution given

  in  any of the forms listed above. 

• Give appropriate numerical measures of center tendency and

• Recognize outliers.

• Compare distributions using graphical methods.

• Employ graphing calculator to obtain summary statistics,

  including   the 5-number summary.  [SC8]

• Employ spreadsheet software to create pie charts and

  histograms. [SC10]

 

 

 

The Normal Distribution

Density Curves and the Normal Distribution; Standard

Normal Calculations

The student will:

• Know that areas under a density curve represent proportions.

• Approximate median and mean on a density curve.

• Recognize the shape and significant characteristics of a

  normal distribution, including the 68-95-99.7 rule.

• Find and interpret the standardized value (z-score) of an

• Find proportions above or below a stated measurement

  given  relevant measures of central tendency and dispersion

  or between two measures.

• Determine whether a distribution approaches normality

 

 

Examining Relationships

Scatter Plots, Correlation; Least-Squares Regression

The student will:

• Identify variables as quantitative or categorical.

• Identify explanatory and response variables.

• Make and analyze scatter plots to assess a relationship

  between two variables.

 

 

 

 

Content/Unit & Skills Acquired

An assessment follows every unit of study.

 

Scatter Plots, Correlation; LSR (Continued)

The student will:

• Find and interpret the correlation r between two quantitative

• Find and analyze regression lines.

• Use regression lines to predict values and assess the validity

  of these predictions.

• Calculate residuals and use their plots to recognize unusual

 

 

Two-Variable Data

Transformation of Relationships; Cautions About Correlation

and Regression; Relations in Categorical Data

The student will:

• Recognize exponential growth and decay.

• Use logarithmic transformations to model linear patterns,

  Use linear regression to predict equations for linear data

  and transform back to a nonlinear model of the original data.

• Recognize limitations in both r and least-squares regression

  lines due to extreme values.

• Recognize lurking variables.

• Explain the difference between correlation and causality.

• Find marginal distributions from a two-way table.

• Describe the relationship between two categorical variables

  using percents.

• Recognize and explain Simpson’s paradox.

 

 

 

Production of Data

Designing Samples; Designing Experiments; Simulating

Experiments

The student will:

• Identify populations in sampling situations.

• Identify different methods of sampling, strengths and

  weaknesses of each, and possible bias that might result

  from sampling issues.

• Recognize the difference between an observational study

  and an experiment.

• Design randomized experiments.

• Recognize confounding of variables and the placebo effect,

  explaining when double-blind and block design would be

• Explain how to design an experiment to support

  cause-and-effect relationships.

 

Blocks

(85 minutes)

 

4 blocks

Chapter 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 blocks

Chapter 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 blocks

Chapter 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blocks

(85 minutes)

 

(Continued)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 blocks

Chapter 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 blocks

Chapter 5

 

 

 

 

SC1—The course provides instruction in exploring data.

 

SC8—The course teaches students how to use graphing calculators to enhance the develop-ment of statistical understanding

through exploring data, assessing models, and/or analyzing data.

 

SC10—The course

demonstrates the use of computers and/or computer output to

enhance the development of statistical understanding through exploring data, analyzing data, and/or assessing models.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SC2—The course provides instruction in sampling.

 

 

SC3—The course

provides instruction in experimentation.

Content/Unit & Skills Acquired

An assessment follows every unit of study.

 

Probability

Idea of Probability; Probability Models; General Probability

Rules

The student will:

• Describe and generate sample spaces for random events.

• Apply the basic rules of probability.

• Use multiplication and addition rules of probability   

• Identify disjointed, complementary, and independent events.

• Use tree diagrams, Venn diagrams, and counting techniques

  In solving probability problems.

 

 

Random Variables

Discrete and Continuous Random Variables, Means, and

Variances of Random Variables

The student will:

• Recognize and define discrete and continuous variables.

• Find probabilities related to normal random variables.

• Calculate mean and variance of discrete random variable.

• Use simulation methods using the graphing calculator and the

  law of large numbers to approximate the mean of a distribution. 

• Use rules for means and for variances to solve problems

  involving sums, differences, and linear combinations of

  random variables.

 

 

 

 

Binomial and Geometric Distributions

Binomial Distributions; Geometric Distributions

The student will:

• Verify four conditions of a binomial distribution: two outcomes,

   fixed number of trials, independent trials, and the same

  probability of success for each trial.

• Calculate cumulative distribution functions, cumulative

  distribution tables and histograms, and means and standard

  deviations of binomial random variables.

• Use a normal approximation to the binomial distribution to

  compute probabilities.

• Verify four conditions of a geometric distribution: two

  outcomes, the same probability of success for each trial,

  independent trials, and the count of interest must be the

  number of trials required to get the first success.

 

 

 

 

Content/Unit & Skills Acquired

An assessment follows every unit of study.

 

Binomial and Geometric Distributions (Continued)

Binomial Distributions; Geometric Distributions

The student will:

• Calculate cumulative distribution functions, cumulative

  distribution tables and histograms, and means and

  standard deviations of geometric random variables.

 

 

Sampling Distributions

Sampling Distributions; Sample Proportions; Sample Means

The student will:

• Identify parameters and statistics in a sample.

• Interpret a sampling distribution, including bias and variability 

  and how to influence each.

• Recognize when a problem involves a sample proportion.

• Analyze problems involving sample proportions, including

  Using the normal approximation to calculate probabilities.

• Recognize when a problem involves sample means.

• Analyze problems involving sample means and apply the   

  central limit theorem to approximate a normal distribution.

 

 

 

Introduction to Inference

Estimating with Confidence, Tests of Significance, Interpreting

Statistical Significance; Inference as Decision

The student will:

• Describe confidence intervals and use them to determine

  sample size.

• State null and alternative hypotheses in a testing situation

  involving a population mean.

• Calculate the one-sample z statistics and p-value for both

  one- sided and two-sided tests about the mean μ using the

  graphing calculator.

• Assess statistical significance by comparing values.

• Analyze the results of significance tests.

• Explain Type I error and Type II error and power in

  significance testing.

 

 

Inference for Distributions

Inference for the Mean of a Population; Comparing Two

Means

The student will:

• Recognize when inference about a mean or comparison of two

  means is necessary.

Content/Unit & Skills Acquired

An assessment follows every unit of study.

 

Inference for Distributions (Continued)

Inference for the Mean of a Population; Comparing Two

Means

 

• Perform and analyze a one-sample t test to hypothesize a

  population mean and discuss the possible problems inherent in

  the test.

• Perform and analyze a two-sample t test to compare the

  difference between two means and discuss the possible

  problems inherent in the test.

• Use the graphing calculator to obtain confidence intervals and

  test hypotheses.

 

 

 Inference for Proportions

Inference for a Population Proportion; Comparing Two

Proportions

The student will:

• Recognize whether one-sample, matched pairs, or two-sample

  procedures are needed.

• Use the z procedure to test significance of a hypothesis about a

  population proportion.

• Use the two-sample z procedure to test the hypothesis  

  regarding equality of proportions in two distinct populations.

• Use the graphing calculator to obtain confidence intervals and

  test hypotheses.

 

 

Inference for Tables

Test for Goodness of Fit; Inference for Two-Way Tables

The student will:

• Choose the appropriate chi-square procedure for a given

• Perform chi-square tests and calculate the various relevant

• Interpret chi-square test results obtained from computer output.

 

 

Inference for Regression

Inference About the Model, Predictions, and Conditions

The student will:

• Recognize when linear regression inference is appropriate

  for a set of data.

• Interpret the meaning of a regression for a given set of data.

• Interpret the results of computer output for regression.

 

 

Content/Unit & Skills Acquired

An assessment follows every unit of study.

 

AP Exam Review

 

 

Analysis of Variance

Inference for Population Spread; One-Way Analysis of

Variance

The student will:

• Recognize the meaning and appropriateness of

  comparing means using ANOVA.

• Interpret the meaning of an ANOVA result and its

  corresponding components.

 

 

Final Project

See example under Course Projects.

 

 

 

 

 

Blocks

(85 minutes)

 

5 blocks

Chapter 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 blocks

Chapter 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 blocks

Chapter 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blocks

(85 minutes)

 

(Continued)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 blocks

Chapter 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 blocks

Chapter 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 blocks

Chapter 11

 

 

 

 

Blocks

(85 minutes)

 

(Continued)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 blocks

Chapter 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 blocks

Chapter 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 blocks

Chapter 14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blocks

(85 minutes)

 

4 blocks

 

 

5 blocks

Chapter 15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 blocks

 

 

 

 

 

SC4—The course provides instruction in anticipating patterns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SC9—The course teaches students how to use graphing calculators, tables, or computer software to enhance the development of statistical

understanding through

performing simulations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SC4—The course provides instruction in anticipating patterns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SC5—The course provides instruction in statistical inference.

 

 

 

SC8—The course teaches students how to use graphing calculators to enhance the develop-ment of statistical understanding through exploring data,

assessing models, and/or analyzing data.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SC8—The course teaches students how to use graphing calculators to enhance the development of statistical understanding through exploring data,

assessing models, and/or analyzing data.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SC5—The course provides instruction in statistical inference.

 

SC8—The course teaches students how to use graphing calculators to enhance the development of statistical understanding through exploring data,

assessing models, and/or analyzing data.

 

 

 

SC5—The course provides instruction in statistical inference.

 

 

SC10—The course

demonstrates the use

of computers and/or computer output to enhance the development of statistical understanding through exploring data, analyzing data, and/or assessing models.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SC6—The course draws connections between all aspects of the statistical process including design, analysis, and conclusions.

 

SC7—The course teaches students how to communicate methods, results and interpretations using the vocabulary of statistics.